[PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen


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  1. says: [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson SUMMARY The Big Screen

    [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen This is the most personal work on cinema yet written by David Thomson a movie historian and critic whose originality of insight is matched only by Manny Farber whose elegant style is unrivaled by all but James Agee and Dwight MacDonald and whose comprehensive and detailed knowledge of the field is unsurpassed by anyone His The Ne

  2. says: SUMMARY The Big Screen David Thomson à 6 READ READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson

    [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen As good as a book that causes you to read about 400 pages over a single day without even really noticing it could beespecially when you finish it the next day Wow So I love David Thomson anyway having picked up on him awhile back an

  3. says: [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen David Thomson à 6 READ READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson

    [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson SUMMARY The Big Screen Madly hectically following my summary of 2017 in books comes this handy fun sized my year in movies which frankly and I probably shouldn’t say this out loud have pound for pound given me actual fun than books this year I know it’s mildly shocking 24 BEST MOVIES OF THE YEARNEWISH MOVIES Your Name – Japanese anime how cutting edge I am but actually everybody will de dazzled and emotionally wrought up with the beau

  4. says: READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen

    [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen Midway through David Thomson’s meandering and self reflective history of world cinema The Big Screen The Story of the Movies and What They Did to Us he discusses British director David Lean’s classic film Bri

  5. says: [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen

    SUMMARY The Big Screen David Thomson à 6 READ [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen You are not watching life You are watching a movie And if maybe the movie feels better than life then that is a va

  6. says: READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson David Thomson à 6 READ [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen

    READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson David Thomson à 6 READ [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen There are very few writers who can write interestingly and accessibly about film history so I can put up with Thomson's occasional habit of talking down to his reader's Yes Mr Thomson we get your references that's why we ha

  7. says: [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen

    SUMMARY The Big Screen David Thomson à 6 READ READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson Over the years we have had many good writers tell the story of cinema One of my favourites has always been Mark Cousins’ ‘The Sto

  8. says: SUMMARY The Big Screen READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson David Thomson à 6 READ

    [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen It should surprise nobody who knows Thomson's work that this grand statement on film is as idiosyncratic as it is authoritative the work of a mystic as much as a scholar Everyone's going to be puzzled by some of his inclusions and annoyed at some of his omissions; perhaps he would be himself if he read it back now Though the criticism I've seen that it erases women from the story does seem unfair Leni Riefens

  9. says: [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen

    [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen David Thomson’s riffy trippy style is not for everyone but he manages to do something really difficult namely explain how the phenomenon he calls “movie” was conceived was born grew up grew old and my phrase turned cold without relying on strict chronology Each chapter dedicated to a key building block of film history reads like a trip down a rabbit hole populated by real life characters eg Howard Hawkes Jean Luc

  10. says: [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen

    READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David Thomson David Thomson à 6 READ [PDF/EBOOK] The Big Screen Loved this book It's a bit dense meaty and challenging said the friend who gave it to me but also very entertaining at least in part David Thompson is a longtime film critic one who actually loves movies but also very sophisticated and intellectual The book is roughly chronological in the first half then goes a

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SUMMARY The Big Screen

READ The Big Screen î PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB E globe through time and across many media to tell the complex gripping paradoxical story of the movies He tracks the ways we were initially enchanted by movies as imitations of life the stories the stars the look and how we allowed them to show us how to live At the same time movies offering a seductive escape from everyday reality and its responsibilities have made it possible for us to evade lif. There are very few writers who can write interestingly and accessibly about film history so I can put up with Thomson s occasional habit of talking down to his reader s Yes Mr Thomson we get your references that s why we have chosen to read your book Carl Webers Kingpins us how to live At the same time movies offering a seductive escape from everyday reality and its responsibilities have made it possible for Captive Embraces Captive #2 us to evade lif. There are very few writers who can write interestingly and accessibly about film history so I can put Paying the Piper up with Thomson s occasional habit of talking down to his reader s Yes Mr Thomson we get your references that s why we have chosen to read your book

READ & DOWNLOAD ↠ PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB à David ThomsonThe Big Screen

READ The Big Screen î PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB E altogether The entranced audience has become a model for powerless and anxiety ridden citizens trying to pursue happiness and dodge terror by sitting uietly in a dark roomDoes the big screen take us out into the world or merely mesmerize us That is Thomson's uestion in this grand adventure of a book vital to anyone trying to make sense of the age of screens the age that than ever we are living in. It should surprise nobody who knows Thomson s work that this grand statement on film is as idiosyncratic as it is authoritative the work of a mystic as much as a scholar Everyone s going to be puzzled by some of his inclusions and annoyed at some of his omissions perhaps he would be himself if he read it back now Though the criticism I ve seen that it erases women from the story does seem unfair Leni Riefenstahl gets treated at length Slim Keith pretty much takes over Howard Hawks chapter and Ingrid Bergman gets one to herself Are these the women we d have preferred Perhaps not for myself I think both Hepburns deserve page time than they get as exemplars in their different ways of what a star should or can be But women they are and it s not as if Thomson doesn t engage with film as male gaze take The Godfather to task for its one great flaw of giving the women nothing to do celebrate the greater opportunities which have patchily arisen for female directors as the old ways have crumbled It s surely telling that both the films he tells us have most impressed him during the writing of the book were directed by women And plenty of big male figures or companies only get mentioned in passing too or omitted entirely Neither Hammer nor Harryhausen makes the index and stranger still nor does James Whale despite his line about the enthralling new world of gods and monsters being a perfect encapsulation of Thomson s thoughts on film Early on when he s muttering about the smaller screens which have taken the cinema s place in the hearts and eyes of the young there s a certain sense of an old man shouting at the cloud But as the book goes on you realise that Thomson knows those little screens were all the children of the big screen There s a recurrent note of fascinated horror at what his own idol the medium to which he s devoted his life has wrought There s a puritan lurking within the cineaste a part of him abidingly uneasy over the moral ambivalence of a form which invites us to admire the actor playing a killer at the same time as we abhor the killer I have tried to show how our attitudes to love identity desire and responsibility have been shaped by moviegoing he writes and the answer is often not a cheerful one One has to hope that the mullahs and Mary Whitehouses never read this book because it contains far too much they could use as ammunition At times he verges on the outright bonkers as when he suggests that consciousness itself may be an outmoded term He asks whether we ever had a choice or are we just helpless victims of the light as if humanity were nothing than moths who somehow contrived to start their own fire The scary thing is though do bear in mind that I ve been reading Peter Watts blog not long before writing this I m not altogether sure that he s altogether wrongNot that you have to buy into the big picture to find plenty of smaller insights here of course Whether or not you agree that the screen is a place where all films live anyway And they are fucking each other all the time you can still be intrigued by the connections that attitude has engendered in Thomson s mind Who knew that I Love Lucy s cameraman Karl Freund had also worked with Murnau on Lugosi s Dracula on Lang s Metropolis Yes that s the sort of thing which nowadays any of us could learn from IMDB the difference being Thomson knows which link to click aso on Murnau Thomson s detailed account of his methods has the surprising effect of making me realise that at least ua director Shadow of the Vampire seems to have been a startlingly accurate portrait And because he s so informed about what was to the extent of bizarre trivia like Lewis Selznick offering the beleaguered Tsar an acting job it has also enriched his ability to muse on what might have been I especially enjoyed the idea of Eisenstein working with the Marx Brothers instead of their sterner relative Karl s heirs Eually he sometimes uestions the plausibility of what did happen as when suggesting he may have made up Yul Brynner starring in a disastrous 1959 film of The Sound and the Fury Alas if he did it has passed now into consensus reality as such things sometimes willIf I seem overawed by this book then yes I am Though not so much so I can t uibble with bits here and there Thomson s use of the singular movie for the art form as a whole when the rest of us might say movies is as per the explanatory footnote comparing music and writing certainly defensible But it s also uite annoying and after an early enthusiastic use perhaps it was intended to have a distancing effect make us think anew it seems to get used much sparsely so perhaps he realised that himself yet had already had an argument about it so didn t feel he could entirely back down The story starts sensibly not with Edison or the Lumi re brothers but with the proto films of Eadweard Muybridge given which and the thread running through the story of film as a monstrous creation consuming its forebears and perhaps even meaning itself it s surprising Thomson doesn t make of the evocative synchronicity whereby the man Muybridge murdered was of all the careers he might have had a theatre critic And there s at least one thing which I m fairly sure must be a straigh up mistake we re told there were 23 million theatres in late twenties America to 18 million in 1933 but also that the population was 125 million and attendance 50 million So there was a cinema for every six people each of which got just over two annual visits I can t find the figures elsewhere myself but I suspect a decimal place has gone astray somewhereStill this is probably the keystone statement by a film writer who associates and rhapsodises like few in the business He can talk about directors with the best while recognising how provisional and temporary it was to treat the director as the big name He knows the classics though seldom deals with them predictably Kane is part of a chapter on Welles and other currents where Ambersons gets its own but he also exhumes Italian or Russian film makers whose names I ve never seen before though granted I m not the film buff some of my friends are especially when it comes to the artier end of things One of the things which proves to him that films have changed the world and not always for the better is the fact that a mediocre movie actor became President certainly the fact that the same role is now played by an actively terrible reality TV host seems to support many of the book s alarmist notions and serves as a great twist epilogue to something written in 2012 And yet for all that they may have done to corrode and ensorcel didn t the films give us enough that we still love them for it As Thomson says of Man With A Movie Camera A heart beats within it that says art is so much important and useless than cockamamie claims for political salvation And at the last while continuing to sound a note of decline he does at least have the grace to admit that cinema s death knell has been tolled prematurely many times before admitting that the simple complex fascination of the moving image will likely be around for a good while yet The Simple Prince uietly in a dark roomDoes the big screen take The Raising The Torch Keeper #3 us out into the world or merely mesmerize Space Vampire Choose Your Own Adventure #71 us That is Thomson's Seven Week Itch uestion in this grand adventure of a book vital to anyone trying to make sense of the age of screens the age that than ever we are living in. It should surprise nobody who knows Thomson s work that this grand statement on film is as idiosyncratic as it is authoritative the work of a mystic as much as a scholar Everyone s going to be puzzled by some of his inclusions and annoyed at some of his omissions perhaps he would be himself if he read it back now Though the criticism I ve seen that it erases women from the story does seem Calling Uncle unfair Leni Riefenstahl gets treated at length Slim Keith pretty much takes over Howard Hawks chapter and Ingrid Bergman gets one to herself Are these the women we d have preferred Perhaps not for myself I think both Hepburns deserve page time than they get as exemplars in their different ways of what a star should or can be But women they are and it s not as if Thomson doesn t engage with film as male gaze take The Godfather to task for its one great flaw of giving the women nothing to do celebrate the greater opportunities which have patchily arisen for female directors as the old ways have crumbled It s surely telling that both the films he tells 12 Blessings of Christmas us have most impressed him during the writing of the book were directed by women And plenty of big male figures or companies only get mentioned in passing too or omitted entirely Neither Hammer nor Harryhausen makes the index and stranger still nor does James Whale despite his line about the enthralling new world of gods and monsters being a perfect encapsulation of Thomson s thoughts on film Early on when he s muttering about the smaller screens which have taken the cinema s place in the hearts and eyes of the young there s a certain sense of an old man shouting at the cloud But as the book goes on you realise that Thomson knows those little screens were all the children of the big screen There s a recurrent note of fascinated horror at what his own idol the medium to which he s devoted his life has wrought There s a puritan lurking within the cineaste a part of him abidingly Against The Grain uneasy over the moral ambivalence of a form which invites A Change in Our Marriage us to admire the actor playing a killer at the same time as we abhor the killer I have tried to show how our attitudes to love identity desire and responsibility have been shaped by moviegoing he writes and the answer is often not a cheerful one One has to hope that the mullahs and Mary Whitehouses never read this book because it contains far too much they could A Clockwork Orange use as ammunition At times he verges on the outright bonkers as when he suggests that consciousness itself may be an outmoded term He asks whether we ever had a choice or are we just helpless victims of the light as if humanity were nothing than moths who somehow contrived to start their own fire The scary thing is though do bear in mind that I ve been reading Peter Watts blog not long before writing this I m not altogether sure that he s altogether wrongNot that you have to buy into the big picture to find plenty of smaller insights here of course Whether or not you agree that the screen is a place where all films live anyway And they are fucking each other all the time you can still be intrigued by the connections that attitude has engendered in Thomson s mind Who knew that I Love Lucy s cameraman Karl Freund had also worked with Murnau on Lugosi s Dracula on Lang s Metropolis Yes that s the sort of thing which nowadays any of Shadows of the Dark Crystal Jim Hensons The Dark Crystal #1 us could learn from IMDB the difference being Thomson knows which link to click aso on Murnau Thomson s detailed account of his methods has the surprising effect of making me realise that at least The Man Who Wrestled With God Light from the Old Testament on the Psychology of Individuation ua director Shadow of the Vampire seems to have been a startlingly accurate portrait And because he s so informed about what was to the extent of bizarre trivia like Lewis Selznick offering the beleaguered Tsar an acting job it has also enriched his ability to muse on what might have been I especially enjoyed the idea of Eisenstein working with the Marx Brothers instead of their sterner relative Karl s heirs Eually he sometimes Enchanter The Spellmonger #7 uestions the plausibility of what did happen as when suggesting he may have made Pumpkinheads up Yul Brynner starring in a disastrous 1959 film of The Sound and the Fury Alas if he did it has passed now into consensus reality as such things sometimes willIf I seem overawed by this book then yes I am Though not so much so I can t Originally published as Dowry of the Angyar and later as the prologue of Rocannon’s World Semley's necklace follows the events of import in the everyday life of Semley an amazingly beautiful but primitive noble on a small world with three separate sen uibble with bits here and there Thomson s The Sunshine Boys use of the singular movie for the art form as a whole when the rest of Mama Always Comes Home us might say movies is as per the explanatory footnote comparing music and writing certainly defensible But it s also Alaska Wolfstate Chronicles #1 uite annoying and after an early enthusiastic Voice of Life The Spoken Mage #4 use perhaps it was intended to have a distancing effect make The Bride and the Buccaneer us think anew it seems to get Remy Goes to Therapy Chevalier Men #2 used much sparsely so perhaps he realised that himself yet had already had an argument about it so didn t feel he could entirely back down The story starts sensibly not with Edison or the Lumi re brothers but with the proto films of Eadweard Muybridge given which and the thread running through the story of film as a monstrous creation consuming its forebears and perhaps even meaning itself it s surprising Thomson doesn t make of the evocative synchronicity whereby the man Muybridge murdered was of all the careers he might have had a theatre critic And there s at least one thing which I m fairly sure must be a straigh Remy Goes to Therapy up mistake we re told there were 23 million theatres in late twenties America to 18 million in 1933 but also that the population was 125 million and attendance 50 million So there was a cinema for every six people each of which got just over two annual visits I can t find the figures elsewhere myself but I suspect a decimal place has gone astray somewhereStill this is probably the keystone statement by a film writer who associates and rhapsodises like few in the business He can talk about directors with the best while recognising how provisional and temporary it was to treat the director as the big name He knows the classics though seldom deals with them predictably Kane is part of a chapter on Welles and other currents where Ambersons gets its own but he also exhumes Italian or Russian film makers whose names I ve never seen before though granted I m not the film buff some of my friends are especially when it comes to the artier end of things One of the things which proves to him that films have changed the world and not always for the better is the fact that a mediocre movie actor became President certainly the fact that the same role is now played by an actively terrible reality TV host seems to support many of the book s alarmist notions and serves as a great twist epilogue to something written in 2012 And yet for all that they may have done to corrode and ensorcel didn t the films give Asterix Annual 1980 us enough that we still love them for it As Thomson says of Man With A Movie Camera A heart beats within it that says art is so much important and The Brats of St Bestoras useless than cockamamie claims for political salvation And at the last while continuing to sound a note of decline he does at least have the grace to admit that cinema s death knell has been tolled prematurely many times before admitting that the simple complex fascination of the moving image will likely be around for a good while yet

David Thomson à 6 READ

READ The Big Screen î PDF, eBook or Kindle ePUB The Big Screen tells the enthralling story of the movies their rise and spread their remarkable influence over us and the technology that made the screen as important as the images it carriesBut The Big Screen is not another history of the movies Rather it is a wide ranging narrative about the movies and their signal role in modern life The celebrated film authority David Thomson takes us around th. This is the most personal work on cinema yet written by David Thomson a movie historian and critic whose originality of insight is matched only by Manny Farber whose elegant style is unrivaled by all but James Agee and Dwight MacDonald and whose comprehensive and detailed knowledge of the field is unsurpassed by anyone His The New Biographical Dictionary of Film Fourth Edition is the only 1000 page reference work I have ever read with complete delight from cover to cover and I hope to do the same with the fifth edition soonAnybody who has read Thomson knows that he is a man of strong opinion who refuses to pull any punches or follow anyone s agenda He s not one of those self conscious mavericks either he likes what he likes for good reasons and tells you what he thinksThis book is even personal and eccentric than the usual Thomson for two reasons 1 it is not precisely about movies but about screens planes of various sizes on which we view images and how their size and the conditions for viewing a massive screen for a multiplex a flat screen TV for your family room an iPhone with ear buds just for you in a crowded airport alone affect the viewing experience and 2 Thomson wrote this book to explore primarily how these screens have shaped his own viewing experiences and only secondarily how they may have affected othersBecause of this dual concentration Thomson s otherwise comprehensive and historical treatment of visual images that move contains some surprising additions and emphases He includes treatments of the early motion photography of Muybridge the significance of I Love Lucy the impact of Marilyn Monroe the narrative structure of pornography and video games as well as a marvelous anecdote and analysis of how he once screened Minnelli s The Clock for a college class by showing the first half forward while simultaneously projecting the second half backward He has almost nothing to say about women in film except for actresses of course very little about the Western and the amount of space he accords a particular classic director is always a personal and sometimes a seemingly arbitrary decisionIt is an enjoyable and informative trip however with many entertaining detours and in spite his divigations Thomson never strays far from his central theme that the most profound subject in all movie is time and the way it passes and resembles itself The House on Tradd Street us and the technology that made the screen as important as the images it carriesBut The Big Screen is not another history of the movies Rather it is a wide ranging narrative about the movies and their signal role in modern life The celebrated film authority David Thomson takes The Horizon The Royal Marines Saga us around th. This is the most personal work on cinema yet written by David Thomson a movie historian and critic whose originality of insight is matched only by Manny Farber whose elegant style is 奔馬 unrivaled by all but James Agee and Dwight MacDonald and whose comprehensive and detailed knowledge of the field is Last to Die unsurpassed by anyone His The New Biographical Dictionary of Film Fourth Edition is the only 1000 page reference work I have ever read with complete delight from cover to cover and I hope to do the same with the fifth edition soonAnybody who has read Thomson knows that he is a man of strong opinion who refuses to pull any punches or follow anyone s agenda He s not one of those self conscious mavericks either he likes what he likes for good reasons and tells you what he thinksThis book is even personal and eccentric than the Night Moves usual Thomson for two reasons 1 it is not precisely about movies but about screens planes of various sizes on which we view images and how their size and the conditions for viewing a massive screen for a multiplex a flat screen TV for your family room an iPhone with ear buds just for you in a crowded airport alone affect the viewing experience and 2 Thomson wrote this book to explore primarily how these screens have shaped his own viewing experiences and only secondarily how they may have affected othersBecause of this dual concentration Thomson s otherwise comprehensive and historical treatment of visual images that move contains some surprising additions and emphases He includes treatments of the early motion photography of Muybridge the significance of I Love Lucy the impact of Marilyn Monroe the narrative structure of pornography and video games as well as a marvelous anecdote and analysis of how he once screened Minnelli s The Clock for a college class by showing the first half forward while simultaneously projecting the second half backward He has almost nothing to say about women in film except for actresses of course very little about the Western and the amount of space he accords a particular classic director is always a personal and sometimes a seemingly arbitrary decisionIt is an enjoyable and informative trip however with many entertaining detours and in spite his divigations Thomson never strays far from his central theme that the most profound subject in all movie is time and the way it passes and resembles itself

  • Hardcover
  • 528
  • The Big Screen
  • David Thomson
  • English
  • 20 March 2020
  • 9780374191894