E–pub [The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl] Ò Timothy Egan

  • ebook
  • 352
  • The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl
  • Timothy Egan
  • English
  • 27 May 2020
  • 9780547347776

Timothy Egan Ê 3 review

The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl review » 3 read Õ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ê Timothy Egan review The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl E opens up with urgency and respect” New York TimesIn an era that promises ever greater natural disasters The Worst Hard Time is “arguably the best nonfiction book yet” Austin Statesman Journal on the greatest environmental disaster ever to be visited upon our land and a powerful cautionary tale about the dangers of trifling with natur. I have about a week to read this for book club and I ve got a lot of books in progress that I hate to set aside so we ll see how this goesUPDATE I gave up I must be the only person on the planet who didn t like this book I found the writing to be overblown over the top even silly at times The way it was organized didn t work for me He d introduce a person or family and I d start to get interested and then he d abandon them and go back to large sweeping passages about the land which made me start to nod offHad he chosen one person or family to tell the story through it could have been fascinating Especially if he d told it straight and without the grating phrasing The Bone Man of Benares A Lunatic Trip Through Love and the World respect” New York TimesIn an era that promises ever greater natural disasters The Worst Hard Time is “arguably the best nonfiction book yet” Austin Statesman Journal on the greatest environmental disaster ever to be visited upon our land and a powerful cautionary tale about the dangers of trifling with natur. I have about a week to The Lost Lupin read this for book club and I ve got a lot of books in progress that I hate to set aside so we ll see how this goesUPDATE I gave up I must be the only person on the planet who didn t like this book I found the writing to be overblown over the top even silly at times The way it was organized didn t work for me He d introduce a person or family and I d start to get interested and then he d abandon them and go back to large sweeping passages about the land which made me start to nod offHad he chosen one person or family to tell the story through it could have been fascinating Especially if he d told it straight and without the grating phrasing

review The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust BowlThe Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl

The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl review » 3 read Õ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ê Timothy Egan review The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl He rise and fall of the region Egan tells of their desperate attempts to carry on through blinding black dust blizzards crop failure and the death of loved ones Brilliantly capturing the terrifying drama of catastrophe Egan does eual justice to the human characters who become his heroes “the stoic long suffering men and women whose lives h. I read a fair amount of history and I usually enjoy it but I don t think I ve ever read a history book that was uite the page turner this one was What I knew before about the 1930s drought in the American Dust Bowl was this there was an agriculture destroying drought in and around Texas and Oklahoma during the Great Depression that made the economic devastation there even worse What I learned here through the personal stories of the people and towns affected was that the Dust Bowl was a man made disaster of the first order an environmental catastrophe due largely to human error ignorance and greed The climatic conditions of the prairies were just not suited to intensive agriculture a fact that was roundly ignored The zeal of the homesteaders who settled the great grasslands of the Midwest may have appeared at the time to be fulfilling the American destiny of westward expansion and progress through the virtuous traits of industry and capitalistic success as they planted bumper crops of wheat in response to high demand for grain But the farming practices launched with such enthusiasm in the early part of the century would bring destruction that proved impossible to control or repair Ecosystems are delicate things There are valuable lessons to be learned here Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it etcDescriptions of weather related events throughout the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles in that era are almost unbelievable Thousands of tons of dirt went airborne on a regular basis Often it sounds like something out of a sci fi book set on another planet or a story of post apocalyptic climate change with barren landscapes unable to sustain any crops or vegetation Cattle would go blind and die with their stomachs full of dirt babies succumbed to dirt pneumonia The regional economy aggravated by the general financial crises that caused and were then sustained by the Depression tanked completely There was no economy Many lived by barter and in sod houses Even if the houses were not made of sod they were full of dirt absolutely all of the time from the constant heavy dust storms despite every attempt to seal doors and windows with damp cloth and tape Summer ground temperatures in the summer could reach 150 degrees Static electricity from the dust storms would stall a moving car or knock a man down if he touched another person And yet people stayed reluctant to leave what they knew just to end up in a bread line in a cold anonymous city somewhere I was on the phone to my mother a couple of times looking for details about her grandparents who had lived near Amarillo Her mother got out of there young and came to California in the 20s so she missed this episode in Texas history And my mom was too young in the 30s to have been told about the distant family s hardships All she knows is she thinks her grandfather had some sort of leather goods business saddles and harnesses perhaps but he was not very successful which I think would have been par for that particular courseEgan uses the life stories of several different families to illustrate the hardships common in both farms and towns There are some heart breaking tales a family trying to bury both a baby and a grandmother on the day of a tremendously brutal dust storm Black Sunday 1935 diary excerpts of a older childless farmer on the Kansas Nebraska border his alfalfa crop dead on the verge of losing his last horses alone and separated from his wife who has had to take a job in the city This is a wonderful piece of research and scholarship told in an engaging manner that brings these experiences to life a great tribute to the memories of those who lived through it The Goodbye Girl Vocal Selections rise and fall of the Gunnin' For Love region Egan tells of their desperate attempts to carry on through blinding black dust blizzards crop failure and the death of loved ones Brilliantly capturing the terrifying drama of catastrophe Egan does eual justice to the human characters who become his heroes “the stoic long suffering men and women whose lives h. I MIA Hunter read a fair amount of history and I usually enjoy it but I don t think I ve ever Overlords of Atlantis and the Great Pyramid read a history book that was uite the page turner this one was What I knew before about the 1930s drought in the American Dust Bowl was this there was an agriculture destroying drought in and around Texas and Oklahoma during the Great Depression that made the economic devastation there even worse What I learned here through the personal stories of the people and towns affected was that the Dust Bowl was a man made disaster of the first order an environmental catastrophe due largely to human error ignorance and greed The climatic conditions of the prairies were just not suited to intensive agriculture a fact that was Magic and Mayhem roundly ignored The zeal of the homesteaders who settled the great grasslands of the Midwest may have appeared at the time to be fulfilling the American destiny of westward expansion and progress through the virtuous traits of industry and capitalistic success as they planted bumper crops of wheat in Good bye response to high demand for grain But the farming practices launched with such enthusiasm in the early part of the century would bring destruction that proved impossible to control or The Black Seminoles History of a Freedom Seeking People repair Ecosystems are delicate things There are valuable lessons to be learned here Those who cannot Milk and CookiesA Frank Asch Bear Story A Parents Magazine Read Aloud Original remember the past are condemned to Greek to Me Learning New Testament Greek Through Memory Visualization repeat it etcDescriptions of weather Milk and CookiesA Frank Asch Bear Story A Parents Magazine Read Aloud Original related events throughout the Texas and Oklahoma panhandles in that era are almost unbelievable Thousands of tons of dirt went airborne on a Airliners in Flight A Gallery of Air To Air Photography regular basis Often it sounds like something out of a sci fi book set on another planet or a story of post apocalyptic climate change with barren landscapes unable to sustain any crops or vegetation Cattle would go blind and die with their stomachs full of dirt babies succumbed to dirt pneumonia The Striving Towards Being The Letters of Thomas Merton and Czeslaw Milosz regional economy aggravated by the general financial crises that caused and were then sustained by the Depression tanked completely There was no economy Many lived by barter and in sod houses Even if the houses were not made of sod they were full of dirt absolutely all of the time from the constant heavy dust storms despite every attempt to seal doors and windows with damp cloth and tape Summer ground temperatures in the summer could Anglo Saxon Paganism reach 150 degrees Static electricity from the dust storms would stall a moving car or knock a man down if he touched another person And yet people stayed The Ghostly Lover reluctant to leave what they knew just to end up in a bread line in a cold anonymous city somewhere I was on the phone to my mother a couple of times looking for details about her grandparents who had lived near Amarillo Her mother got out of there young and came to California in the 20s so she missed this episode in Texas history And my mom was too young in the 30s to have been told about the distant family s hardships All she knows is she thinks her grandfather had some sort of leather goods business saddles and harnesses perhaps but he was not very successful which I think would have been par for that particular courseEgan uses the life stories of several different families to illustrate the hardships common in both farms and towns There are some heart breaking tales a family trying to bury both a baby and a grandmother on the day of a tremendously brutal dust storm Black Sunday 1935 diary excerpts of a older childless farmer on the Kansas Nebraska border his alfalfa crop dead on the verge of losing his last horses alone and separated from his wife who has had to take a job in the city This is a wonderful piece of Cuckold Diaper Slave research and scholarship told in an engaging manner that brings these experiences to life a great tribute to the memories of those who lived through it

read Õ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ê Timothy Egan

The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl review » 3 read Õ eBook or Kindle ePUB Ê Timothy Egan review The Worst Hard Time The Untold Story of Those Who Survived the Great American Dust Bowl The dust storms that terrorized the High Plains in the darkest years of the Depression were like nothing ever seen before or since Timothy Egan’s critically acclaimed account rescues this iconic chapter of American history from the shadows in a tour de force of historical reportage Following a dozen families and their communities through t. BIG RABBIT DRIVE SUNDAY BRING CLUBS Don t judge the rabbits were a menace to their livelihood These folks were plagued by jackrabbits grasshoppers and endless dust Clubbing some rabbits at felt like they were fighting back while they lost everything It is hard to say which is worse the steady constant destruction ever present dust from four drought waves in ten years or the intense black blizzards which only lasted hours or days Nobody knew what to call it It was not a raincloud Nor was it a cloud holding ice pellets It was not a twister It was thick like coarse animal hair it was alive People close to it described a feeling of being in a blizzard a black blizzard they called it with an edge like steel wool There was enough static electricity in one to knock a person unconscious short out car engines and cause blue flames to erupt from metal fences It would fell alive like a monsterEgan gives a good background The lure of inexpensive land image enhanced by land speculators The dramatic rise in wheat prices and a surge in production In 1910 the price of wheat stood at eighty cents a bushel good enough for anyone who had outwitted a few dry years to make enough money to get through another year and even put something away Five years later with world grain supplies pinched by the Great War the price had than doubled Farmers increased production by 50 percent When the Turkish navy blocked the Dardanelles they did a favor for dryland wheat farmers that no one could have imagined Europe relied on Russia for export grain With Russian shipments blocked the United States stepped in and issued a proclamation to the plains plant wheat to win the war And for the first time the government guaranteed the price at two dollars a bushel though the war backed by the wartime food administrator a multimillionaire public servant named Herbert Hoover Wheat was no longer a staple of a small family farmer but a commodity with a price guarantee and a global market The economic boom and increased population The uncertainties of 1919 were over wrote F Scott Fitzgerald the most insightful chronicler of the hubris of the 1920s America was going on the greatest gaudiest spree in history Wheat prices began to drop after the war The stock market crashed in 1929 and the first of the four droughts was in 1930 1931 Three little words achingly familiar on the Western farmer s tongue rule life in the dust bowl of the continent if it rains Robert Geiger a reporter for the Associated Press 1935 Not to be dismissive of Midwesterners potential for mayhem but don t think of them as a rioting mob They were starving and President Hoover didn t believe in government assistanceI wish there was on recovery and prevention Or maybe I wish there was recovery and preventative measures Tapping the Ogallala Auifer for irrigation isn t a long term solution