The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub


10 thoughts on “The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

  1. says: The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub review ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Edward Dolnick Edward Dolnick × 7 review

    The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub Chaotic as it looked these earliest scientists declared the universe was in fact an intricate and perfectly regulated clockwork This was the tail end of Shakespeare's century and these were brilliant ambitious confused conflicted men They believed in angels and alchemy and the devil and they believed that the universe followed precise mathematical laws from the author’s websiteLondon in 1660 was a pretty gross place

  2. says: Edward Dolnick × 7 review review ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Edward Dolnick The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

    Free download The Clockwork Universe The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub review ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Edward Dolnick While browsing the bookstore and idly picking up anything that looked vaguely interesting I found The Clockwork Universe which caught my admittedly somewhat eccentric wide ranging curiosity Within a few hours I had a line of people calling dibs on reading it next my mother an ex a geeky friend a not so geeky drinking buddy and only one dear friend a pretentious robot on occasion rolling his eyes before wandering off t

  3. says: The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

    The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub Edward Dolnick × 7 review The book takes place in the 1600 hundreds in Europe Superstition and belief in the supernatural were common place To this background Dolnick tells us the stories of Isaacs Newton Galileo Kepler Copernicus Descartes and Leibniz These m

  4. says: Edward Dolnick × 7 review The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

    The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub Old timey science It’s not just dudes in powdered wigs Naw it's about their ecstatic sense of wonder grueling focus and sometimes batshit craziness Dolnick is an incredible spinner of yarns He builds a narrative with humor and panache whether it’s something inspiring like Newton’s drive to study the infinite or something just weird l

  5. says: The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub review ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Edward Dolnick Edward Dolnick × 7 review

    The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub The best passage of this book is in the conclusion of chapter 9Scientists tend to have little interest in history even the history of their own subject They turn to the past only to pluck out the discoveries and insights that turned out to be

  6. says: The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

    The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub The year 1660 was a turning point in British political cultural and intellectual life The restoration of King Charles II after eleven brutal years of military dictatorship awoke a new spirit of vibrancy and optimism in Britain And one of the earliest yet most enduring results of the new era was the formation of the Royal

  7. says: Free download The Clockwork Universe The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

    Free download The Clockwork Universe The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub In the 1600's when Edward Dolnick’s fascinating story sets off Europe is a dark and dangerous place Superstition and ignorance are the dominating forces in every area of life People die young the average life expectancy is

  8. says: Free download The Clockwork Universe Edward Dolnick × 7 review The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

    The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub This was a slightly tricky book to rate I gave it four stars out of five on the merit of the book itself though I would recommend it mostly to people who are interested in the history of science but not heavily read in that area already This book is not one that sets a standard for scholarship but is a well written introduction to a worthy topicIsaac Newton is the primary focus of this book though his rival Leibniz als

  9. says: Free download The Clockwork Universe Edward Dolnick × 7 review review ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Edward Dolnick

    Free download The Clockwork Universe Edward Dolnick × 7 review review ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Edward Dolnick This book is a winner I really enjoyed the manner in which the history of scientific research played out with many interesting stories

  10. says: The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub

    The Clockwork Universe Free E–pub In 1600 the philosopher Bruno was burned at the stake for proclaiming that the earth was just one of many planets in solar systems thr

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Free download The Clockwork Universe

Free download The Clockwork Universe review The Clockwork Universe 107 The Clockwork Universe is the story of a band of men who lived in a world of dirt and disease but pictured a universe that ran like a perfect machine A meld of history and science this book is a group portrait of some of the greatest minds who ever lived as they wrestled with nature’s most sweeping mysteries The answers they uncovered still hold the key to how we understand the worldAt the end of the seve. Chaotic as it looked these earliest scientists declared the universe was in fact an intricate and perfectly regulated clockwork This was the tail end of Shakespeare s century and these were brilliant ambitious confused conflicted men They believed in angels and alchemy and the devil and they believed that the universe followed precise mathematical laws from the author s websiteLondon in 1660 was a pretty gross place Refuse and worse clogged the streets Buildings were thrown together haphazardly structurally unsound leaning on each other for support Medical science was worse than useless Much of the city was as much a warren as a modern urban center The Big One plague wise did major damage in 1665 and The Great Fire laid waste to massive swaths of the city a year later from Wikimedia One might expect that such unpleasantness would cause or at least reinforce a plunge into an even darker age But among the ashes a few hardy sprouts were bursting forth The Royal Society of London for the Improvement of Natural Knowledge not to be confused with another well known Royal Society a group of scholars who had begun meeting in the 1640s was officially founded in November 1660 Science would rise from the massive destruction of this era to revolutionize the world Such seminal notions as the makeup of light the significance of infinity peering into the microscope to discern layers of life previously unsuspected gazing through the telescope to further the explorations begun elsewhere calculating a new kind of mathematics in order to understand and predict motion figuring out the dynamics of the motion of the planets stars sun and the Earth realizing the existence of gravity establishing experimentation as central to what we know as the scientific method and establishing the necessity of peer review to substantiate experimental claims were among the many changes this group of men wrought Not too shabby The Author the one not licking his nose from his siteIn the immortal words of Butch Cassidy Who are those guys Edward Dolnick not only gives us a nice overview of the times but offers a look at some of the larger personalities who propelled humanity into the modern age The focus is definitely on the Royal Society chaps Newton most particularly but there are plenty of non British scientists Dolnick examines with his literary microscope Galileo did a lot than look up and see moons of other planets Other luminaries are given some attention as well Leeuwenhoek Copernicus Descartes and Kepler for example Gottfried Leibniz is hardly a household name but certainly should be He did as much as Newton to create Calculus and the language he used to explain the subject is the one we use today Dolnick looks at the significance of Calculus Existing math was fine for objects but inadeuate to cope with motion Calculus fit the bill nicely The universe they saw was as regular as clockwork and the clock was designed by the Great Mathematician Calculus was not only a key to understanding how things worked but a passage to the very mind of GodIt is pretty amazing that this revolution in human understanding came at a time when a radical and hugely popular religious tract Day of Doom was published 50 Shades of Hell providing the fuel for many a fire and brimstone sermon It was a time when the sundry miseries of the world were seen as a manifestation of Divine displeasure Geez cranky isn t He The Society members were not atheists But they craved a different kind of buzz They saw their work as ferreting out the mechanisms employed by the creator all the early scientists shared a mental landscape They all lived precariously between two worlds the medieval one they had grown up in and a new one they had only glimpsed These were brilliant ambitious confused conflicted men They believed in angels and alchemy and the devil and they believed that the universe followed precise mathematical laws Christopher Wren not only designed many of the great buildings of the time most famously St Paul s but was one of the founders of the Society serving for a time at its president He also advanced the science of meteorology and specialization in medicine Robert Boyle a Society member is considered the first modern chemist But if you start using experimentation as a means of discerning truth that presents rather a direct challenge to the powers that be who had accumulated a monopoly on revealed truth well their interpretation of revelation anyway Not only could the extremely well to do fiddle about with things scientific but raising up the individual as a possible source of truth on par with that of ancient institutions was rather a big deal One might imagine that these radical ideas were about as welcome as a Metallica solo on The 700 Club Science in public was a new notion as experiments were conducted with audiences Results were peer reviewed as well the beginning of a core scientific practice They even changed how science was communicated moving toward plain language instead of the flowery mode of the time Even the notion of progress was new as most saw the world as existing in an ever descending spiral since the eviction of Adam and Eve from the Garden Clockwise from top left Robert Boyle Christopher Wren Gottfried Leibnitz and Robert Hooke all images from WikimediaIt is unfortunate that some of the great minds in human history could do such ground breaking work and remain such monumental schmucks Newton stands out as a leader of his generation for than just his genius Anyone dealing with Newton needed the delicate touch and elaborate caution of a man trying to disarm a bomb Until he picked up the Principia from the printer and delivered the first copies to Newton Halley yes that Halley never dared even for a moment to relax his guard After engaging in decades of petty battles with Royal Society member Robert Hooke Newton had the last laugh when Society uarters were moved The only member portrait that somehow mysteriously did not make the trip was that or Mr Hooke No relation to the captain When Gottfried Leibniz the other creator of Calculus foolishly submitted his claim to the Royal Society for recognition of his accomplishment expecting a fair hearing he did not count on the venom of the Society head one Isaac Newton s willingness to press his thumb on the scale One must wonder if the apocryphal apple that landed on Mr Newton s head was gently released by an overhanging branch or lobbed by one of his associates in a perfect parabola It will come as no shock that when Newton died at age 84 he remained a virgin establishing a cruel precedent for future generations of nerds One might say for generations of nerds to come but I wouldn t no never No not the inventor of the fig newtonEdward Dolnick has a breezy style informative without feeling too formal and the book is rich with fascinating detail The root of the word disaster is explained for example and he lets us in on how many contemporary phrases such as for whom the bell tolls originate in the 17th century Dolnick has written on a diversity of subjects Art forgery the theft of Munch s painting The Scream a disarming story of John Wesley Powell s exploration of the Colorado River a dreamy book on Freud and a glittering book on the gold rush His writing is fluid in form and fun in contentSo big egos big change much silliness but in the end a pretty damned big deal I have been present at a few births Messy affairs wet sticky lots of foul language and screaming exceptional volumes of human liuids and mucous But the results once you scrape off the goo wipe here and there do some stitching up swear that this is the last time and cover the primary result in a soft blanket can be pretty amazing There are some even in the modern world who cannot seem to get past their irate 17th century establishment predecessors favoring revelation over intellectual revolution These are people for whom no change no growth no earthly knowledge is welcome But a new vision was indeed brought into the world Messy bloody halting vulnerable but ultimately destined to grow into the most powerful force humanity had seen since the invention of agriculture It is very much worth your time to poke your nose into the delivery room and see what the ruckus was all about Tick tock Review posted 12414 EXTRA STUFFEven though I had read the book a few years back I had only written a partial review and had relegated it to the missed opportunities stack Credit must be given here to GR pal Traveller whose gentle encouragement helped midwife this review into being Without that little push the review would have remained unwritten The author at his site and on FB An interview at HarperAnother on the Writer Interviews siteDolnick on Radio Lab and talking about his book on C Span

review ë eBook, PDF or Kindle ePUB × Edward Dolnick

The Clockwork Universe

Free download The Clockwork Universe review The Clockwork Universe 107 R Disease was a punishment ordained by God astronomy had not yet broken free from astrology and the sky was filled with omens It was a time when little was known and everything was new These brilliant ambitious curious men believed in angels alchemy and the devil and they also believed that the universe followed precise mathematical laws a contradiction that tormented them and changed the course of history. In the 1600 s when Edward Dolnick s fascinating story sets off Europe is a dark and dangerous place Superstition and ignorance are the dominating forces in every area of life People die young the average life expectancy is about 30 with many falling offer to crime and disease or to doctors who were likely to kill their patients than to cure them Those are literally dark times long before any system of lighting was discovered and should you in those days need to venture outside after dark the only light that would illuminate your way would be the moon and the stars or a flickering flame of a lantern in your handIt was a century of plague and war and yet it was also unlikely as it may seem a moment in history when a handful of men mathematicians and astronomers turned their attention to the skies in order to decipher the laws by which God himself a great mathematician had designed the universe The results were to say the least unexpectedFollowing the past discoveries and theories of Copernicus and Galileo the future scientific giants Kepler Descartes Leibniz and most importantly Isaac Newton laid stone by stone foundations for our modern science As a result of their efforts there followed a discovery of calculus telescope and forces that drove the motion of moon and stars and all with an original intention to strengthen the glory of GodThe journey that started with a desire to understand God and his magnificent creation set off a scientific chain reaction that led far away from its original purpose Explanations those deeply religious men found and the logic within it ended up instead of deciphering God s cosmic code undermining the very belief that they ventured to prove And by doing so ironically enough they were the ones that opened another path of reasoning that allowed science to uestion if He The Almighty had anything to do with it at all I loved listening about the discoveries and the personalities and feuds between them because the scientists whose names we know so well were also people of flesh and blood and oh so considerable egos My sincere thanks to Mr Dolnick for bringing the science closer and painting such an accessible and enjoyable picture of the people behind the science

Edward Dolnick × 7 review

Free download The Clockwork Universe review The Clockwork Universe 107 Nteenth century an age of religious wars plague and the Great Fire of London when most people saw the world as falling apart these earliest scientists saw a world of perfect order They declared that chaotic as it looked the universe was in fact as intricate and perfectly regulated as a clock This was the tail end of Shakespeare’s century when the natural land the supernatural still twined around each othe. The year 1660 was a turning point in British political cultural and intellectual life The restoration of King Charles II after eleven brutal years of military dictatorship awoke a new spirit of vibrancy and optimism in Britain And one of the earliest yet most enduring results of the new era was the formation of the Royal SocietyIt was a heady time and there are heady tales to be told of it both in history and in fiction Among the most successful of the latter are Neal Stephenson s three volume Baroue Cycle and one suspects that it is their readership whom Edward Dolnick may have had had in mind when writing The Clockwork Universe Isaac Newton the Royal Society and the Birth of the Modern UniverseDolnick s writing style is immediately engaging he is good humoured possessed of a dry wit and a pleasing turn of phrase In his presentation of mathematical and scientific ideas he takes great pains to render them clear to an audience not only of non specialists but of complete novices He writes of science like one of those inspirational teachers who can make these things make sense to the least scientific of studentsThe book is structured in three parts The first sets the historical scene of 1660s London the Restoration the plague of 1665 the Great Fire the early work of the Royal Society Part Two goes back in time to discuss the work of Copernicus Kepler and Galileo and even the ancient Greeks to provide the scientific context for Newton s discoveries Part Three focuses on Newton himself his discoveries in the fields of mathematics physics and astronomy and his long running feud with Leibnitz over the invention sic of calculus Surely mathematical laws are discovered not invented In Parts Two and Three Dolnick is clearly on home turf writing with the easy authority of one who understands both his subject and how to communicate it The book is badly let down however by Part One the historical element ironically entitled Chaos though probably for the wrong reasonsDolnick is a scientist he is no historian He is at his weakest when discussing religious belief and unfortunately takes up a great deal of the first 100 pages with this discussion Whilst he makes some useful points about the generality of religious belief at the time in particular the universal belief in eternal damnation and hellfire most of his discussion is a gross over simplification treating religion as something static and homogeneous ignoring the wide spectrum of beliefs that characterised the seventeenth century ignoring the distinction between religious belief itself influencing what a scientist might be prepared to believe and Church doctrine which dictated what they would be able to teach or publishFor example he observes p 98 that it was not coincidence that seventeenth century England welcomed science on the grounds that science supported religion and thrived and seventeenth century Italy feared science on the grounds that science undermined religion and decayed but he fails to distinguish anywhere in his narrative between Protestantism and Catholicism or between their respective views on scientific discovery or even to mention the Reformation as a key factor in creating an environment for the pursuit of scientific endeavourEually much of Part One is overlaid with a wide eyed na vet and bemusement better suited to a high school student s first essay on an unfamiliar subject For example Dolnick cannot uite get his head around the fact that Newton and his fellows discoverers of the fundamental laws of physics still believed in astrology witchcraft alchemy and uack medicine He gazes in stupefied wonder at the fact that the Royal Society witnessed many experiments that we would now consider ridiculous How do we know these things are ridiculous Because of our advanced scientific understanding understanding gained through centuries of experiments both groundbreaking and well ridiculous Nor does he give any serious consideration to the political and social context to the Restoration as a major political event which provided the climate and the catalyst for a new spirit of scientific enuiry Indeed King Charles II is depicted as a caricature and a buffoon rather than as a canny ruler who re established domestic peace and economic prosperity in his realm after decades of factionalism brutality and civil war In these respects Dolnick s over simplification ends up misleading the reader ironically Neal Stephenson s uicksilver for all that it is fiction offers far insight than Dolnick into what made these men tickThe narrative becomes credible in Part Two though Dolnick s chronology becomes somewhat haphazard jumping about from the ancient Greeks to the sixteenth century to the seventeenth to Darwin in the nineteenth with no apparent logic or reason His regular references to what Galileo and Newton would have believed eg p 124 would be extremely confusing to a reader who doesn t already have the chronology firmly lodged in their head Galileo died at age 77 in the year Newton was born The timeline provided at the start of the book does not wholly compensate for thisThe book s subtitle is also somewhat misleading in that the Royal Society plays only a bit part in Dolnick s narrative Newton Leibnitz and the Birth of the Modern Universe would be a accurate descriptionAnother minor irritant whilst the book is peppered with uotations in support of Dolnick s arguments many of the direct uotations from writers of the period are poorly referenced the endnotes often cite only a secondary source usually another modern day historian s work rather than the primary source of the uotationWhilst by the end of the book the reader may have a better knowledge of aspects of the seventeenth century for a proper understanding of the period one must turn to the work of people like Lisa Jardine Nevertheless The Clockwork Universe or at least its second and third parts offer as thorough accessible and comprehensive an overview of the science of the seventeenth century as the lay reader could hope for and for this reason alone it belongs on the shelf of anyone with an interest in this remarkable period of scientific discovery

  • Hardcover
  • 378
  • The Clockwork Universe
  • Edward Dolnick
  • English
  • 04 June 2019
  • 9780061719516